Category Archives: Geese

Thankful

Thanksgiving Day

On Thanksgiving we had goose.  Yes, I finally did it.  We were thankful for food on the table.

Our plan was to put it in the smoker and 6 to 7 hours later have a wonderful savory feast.  Our plans were interrupted when Bob found a starving and dehydrated opossum trapped in the smoker.   We haven’t a clue how long he had been in there.

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Apparently, having gotten in through the little adjustable air vent on the firebox, he then got into the smoking chamber.  In doing so, he dislodged the small grate and trapped himself.  (We walked away and gave him a chance to get out.  When we came back he was gone.) 

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Weak and filthy with soot, we are certain he was thankful too. 

Having no time to pressure wash the smoker and disinfect it I had to go to plan B.  Roasting the goose in the oven.  I hate doing that because of all the greasy mess and smoke, but I tried it a different way!  Dragging down the big, blue, enamel, roasting pan that once belonged to Bob’s mother, I put the goose in, put the lid on, and Voila!  No greasy smoking mess!  I am thankful.  ;)

Bob came in later in the afternoon and smelled the goose in the oven…

Oh man, this smells so good!  I’m glad we had to prepare the goose in the oven because it smells like the holidays when I was a kid!

He was thankful for the memories of holiday gatherings and his family.

Fast forward to yesterday…

Which found us at the Mountain Farmlet and working feverishly.  Bob was inside doing demo, and I was outside moving and storing the (possibly) useable planks of lumber from the demo.  In between I finished cleaning out the sheds, and then went walkabout in the woods.

I took myself directly to the bridge to look at the creek.  The creek and the bridge define the southernmost tip of our property.  While I was there, the neighbor lady came over and introduced herself.  We talked for almost an hour and got to know quite a bit about each other.  She seems so nice, and I look forward to being up there full time and having her as a friend.

We have a ‘date’, she and I, to go down into the creek bed and explore, “when it isn’t too hot and there won’t be snakes.”    She’s never been down to the creek!  We have to do this, and when we go I will make sure she won’t have to go bush-whacking like I did to get there.  There was lots of *saw vine. YIKES!  No wonder she’s never been down to see it!  :D

I went down and followed the creek for quite a ways in both directions.  It was lovely.  Here is what I found…

Later, I went into the woods and forging off of our trail this is what I found.  If you are not Lori of Day by Day the Farmgirl Way you may not appreciate the significance of these last photos.  ;)

Evidence of life

I was told by the Octogenarian that the deer no longer come here.  Well, they do!  You just need to know the signs.  Thank you for teaching me, Lori.

So thankful!

*NOTE:   The locals call this plant Saw Vine, but it goes by Cat Briar, greenbrier vine, or its botanical name of Smilax bona-nox.  To see where it grows look HERE.

Saw vine information can be linked to by clicking on its name above, but an awesome image of the plant can be found on Steven Schwartzman’s Portraits of Wildflowers  by clicking HERE

The Mystery is Solved!

Since buying the property I have been seeing large floaters in the water.  Some are over two feet long!  I had been told that they were snapping turtles, but I could never see them. Trying to get closer only caused the shadowy shapes to dive down deeper.

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Do you see those scary dark spots in the water?  Do you think they are snapping turtles?

Sunday afternoon I tried a different tactic.  I walked very slowly, and cautiously to the pond.  I stopped and waited several times for the shadows to resurface and then put my tripod up in the shade.  Being in the shade masked me, but the awesome part was when the slanty light finally revealed the mystery.

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I went hunting,

What did I see?

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I saw a big Catfish

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Looking at me!

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So happy there are no snapping turtles to bite the feet of my geese!

Saturday Snaps: georgie plays

Georgie, is the type of goose that gives all geese a bad name.  He hisses, pulls out chicken’s feathers, pinches the dogs, and me!    It is unfortunate that he has such an ill temper, because on days like this, he does make me laugh with his playfulness.

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The gate to the chicken’s run lets chickens in and keeps Georgie out!  The item he is playing with is the scoop I use to dispense the scratch grains… Georgie loves chicken scratch.  ;)

Have a lovely day!

 

Goose Pail Tales: a goose’s gotta dibble

Living in an older home, on land that has been ranched, farmed and subdivided since the very early 18oos, leads to some interesting finds.

Digging for gardens, or even just the rainstorms we get, can bring many interesting items to the surface.  Pocket knives, old bottles and tools, items thrown into the burn pile that wouldn’t burn, and more.  There are tales of Indian arrowheads to be found everywhere here in Alabama, and that should not be surprising as this was once Native Amerindian land.  Though I confess, I have yet to find any of this valuable treasure here on the Farmlet.

What I do find, after the fact, are the items the rain loosens and brings up.  Things my geese will dibble up out of the soil, and like a Raccoon, will take to the water pail and wash.

To my chagrin, these items look dangerous and non-foodworthy.    For your interest, or not ;) , here are some treasures my geese have collected so far this year…

Goose pail trashEach of these items were found at the end of the day when I dumped their water pails!

Row 1, L to R:  rusted clockwork; a 2 in. reflector;  a plastic soldier who’s seen some pretty serious action; an 8 in. plastic zip tie;  a small bit of white plastic; a hose washer; a strange, plastic, locking clip; and a rubberized covering for a tool tip.

Row 2, L to R:  An ancient bit of barbed wire; wire; a row of nails from 1 inch to 5 inches in length;  two bits of *twisted mystery metal; and an underwire from a rather large cupped bra, with plastic coating missing. Eaten?  :P

Row 3, L to R:  An eye screw with a bit of wire attached; a bolt with nut and washer rusted in place; an aluminum screw cap; a fuse from an automobile; a rather sharp piece of heavy gauge, cut aluminum; two miscellaneous bits of twisted, aluminum wire; and …

Row 4, L to R:  Various pieces of glass from broken windows and old glass bottles!  I find this everywhere on the property!  I don’t know why we’re all not missing toes!  Scary.

When I see the items the geese leave behind in their water, I often wonder how much of it I don’t see.  That is to say, how much is small enough to be EATEN!

When I prepare my chickens for the table I have seen bits of glass they swallowed whole, usually pea sized or smaller.  Thankfully, their crops and the rocks they swallow work the edges off the glass shards and apparently with no harm to the bird.  But then I have to wonder…

What have the geese swallowed?

I haven’t a clue.  I can only assume that if any items were swallowed, they  were nothing deleterious to their health!

It is going to rain again today and tomorrow

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*INTERESTING:  I went looking for barbed wire history, and found this display:

Barbed wire 2(Available for sale HERE)

I may have a bit of antique Crandal ‘Champion’ ca. 1879, or Hodge ‘Spur Rowel’  (sp?) ca. 1887.  Neither of them collectible in their rusted state, but a fun find! 

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Hm,  if I train them right, maybe they’ll find something really good and I’ll get rich!

!!!